A Smile is Worth a Thousand Words: Tooth Removal & Dental Extractions

Depending on your oral health situation, you may one day need to undergo tooth extraction. Not only can this be scary, but it can also be painful. If you’re ready to learn more about how to remove teeth and what to expect when going through dental extractions, keep reading. This guide will explain everything you need to know about tooth removal and the process that follows this procedure so you can get back to smiling as soon as possible!

Why might I need a tooth removed?

Tooth removal, also known as dental extraction, is necessary when teeth become infected or too damaged to remain in the mouth. If you’re suffering from pain and swelling in the area of your tooth and it has been determined that it cannot be repaired with a root canal or other procedure, then tooth extraction may be your best option for removing this diseased tooth. There are two types of tooth extraction: surgical and non-surgical extraction. A surgical extract will involve cutting into the gum tissue around the infected tooth to remove it while leaving its roots behind. Non-surgical extractions are performed by an oral surgeon who will use an instrument called an elevator to cut through the gums and pull out the diseased teeth.

What can I expect during the procedure?

Tooth removal and dental extractions are one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures that dentists perform. This procedure can be done for various reasons, including toothaches, wisdom teeth extraction, and to provide more space for orthodontics. Patients may be given an injection (local anesthesia) or have their mouth numbed before the dentist begins to remove the tooth. The dentist will often use dental forceps to grip onto the tooth or root structure then twist it back and forth until it comes out of its socket. He or she may also apply pressure on the surrounding tissue with his or her fingers in order to help ease this process. Once removed, patients should expect some discomfort as well as soreness in their gums for up to two weeks following treatment.

What are the risks associated with tooth removal?

Dental extractions are the removal of teeth from the mouth. This procedure can be completed for different reasons such as to remove an injury-causing tooth or to make room for other teeth. Tooth removal can be done in many ways, including local anesthesia and surgery with general anesthesia, but it’s important to note that there are risks associated with this procedure. One risk is that it could cause temporary or permanent damage to the gums or jawbone due to improper extraction techniques, while another risk might be exposure to harmful bacteria during the procedure which could lead to infection. Noosa Family Dental has a team of dentists who know how best to approach tooth removal and will ensure any risks associated with it are eliminated.

How can I care for my teeth after the procedure?

Caring for your teeth after tooth removal or dental extraction can be difficult, especially if you are dealing with any post-surgery pain. Here are some tips to help you care for your teeth and mouth.

1) Get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. The less you move around, the less stress there will be on your surgical site. Drinking plenty of water will also help keep your mouth moist and comfortable.

2) Use saline rinses to cleanse your mouth both before and after meals. Saline rinses are easy to make using a cup of warm water mixed with 1 teaspoon salt plus 2 teaspoons table or cane sugar.

Tooth removal, also known as dental extraction, is necessary when teeth become infected or too damaged to remain in the mouth. If you’re suffering from pain and swelling in the area of your tooth and it has been determined that it cannot be repaired with a root canal or other procedure, then tooth extraction may be your best option for removing this diseased tooth. There are two types of tooth extraction: surgical and non-surgical extraction. A surgical extract will involve cutting into the gum tissue around the infected tooth to remove it while leaving its roots behind. Non-surgical extractions are performed by an oral surgeon who will use an instrument called an elevator to cut through the gums and pull out the diseased teeth.

By Christopher

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